Engineers' Society of Western Pennsylvania

Location

337 Fourth Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15222

Phone: (412) 261-0710 Email: eswp@eswp.com Get Directions

Workshops

The IWC Continuing Ed Workshop program is designed to provide practical information that includes a basic understanding of the topic as well as detailed case studies.

They are presented by experts in the field and are loaded with technical content, not for sales information. Each workshop will provide an opportunity for a technical exchange between the students, the instructor and other workshop participants.

Workshops are based on minimum reservations. Each 4-hour workshop is $250 each for registered conference attendees. Register for 2 or more workshops and receive a $100 discount.

 

Sunday, November, 10, 2019; 1:00 – 5:00 PM

W01: Water Treatment 101

This workshop is a great introductory course covering many of the basic concepts of industrial water treatment. It will address unit operations (clarification, filtration, lime/soda ash softening, iron and manganese removal, membrane filters, and roughing demineralizers) used in water preparation for industry with emphasis on power, chemical industry, and refineries. It includes treatment of cooling water systems as well as boiler water makeup. Wastewater generated by these unit operations and their treatment and disposal will be discussed. Basic water chemistry requirements for low, medium, and high-pressure boilers will also be discussed.

Dennis McBride, Burns & McDonnell, Kansas City, MO

 

W02: The Wonderful World of Reverse Osmosis

Reverse osmosis (RO) has become a very popular and useful water treatment tool, for both water and wastewater applications. Understanding the fundamentals of RO, particularly as applications become more challenging in the environment of reduce, reuse, and recycle, is critical to optimal operations. However, during the growth or RO applications, some of the basics have been lost in shuffle. And, many times professionals and operators familiar with other demineralization technologies are now faced with operating RO systems with little or no training. This Workshop covers the basics and best practices of RO technology, from sound design to proper operating techniques. Fouling and concentration polarization, data collection and normalization, cleaning and storage are just some of the topics included in this Workshop. This Workshop is intended for all who need to understand the essentials of RO to help obtain optimal performance of this technology.

Jane Kucera, Nalco Water, an Ecolab Company, Naperville, IL

 

W03: Ion Exchange Technology and Practical Operating Practices

This workshop provides a detailed review of the various ion exchange processes for softening and demineralizing water as well as preparation for boilers, cooling, and process applications. A section on how to evaluate systems, their resin, operation, and water quality of ion exchange units is an excellent troubleshooting and informative portion of this workshop. A review of the different types of ion exchange resins available along with the newest developments and how those can be applied to provide specific water quality is a must for water treatment system operations. This is a great opportunity to ask questions and solve problems.

Wayne Bernahl, W. Bernahl Enterprises, Ltd., Elmhurst, IL

 

W04: Wet FGD Chemistry and Operational Impacts on Wastewater Quality Discharge

This workshop will provide an overview of wet FGD chemistry and operating factors that will affect the wastewater quality. The various subsystems of the wet FGD system will be discussed including reagent handling, reagent preparation, absorber internals, recycle slurry, slurry spray headers, mist eliminators, primary dewatering, secondary dewatering, and wastewater treatment. The workshop will discuss the operational chemistry involved in removal of SO2 from the flue gas and highlight how operating parameters like pH, conductivity, ORP, and other issues affect the overall process. The workshop will also address how operation of the wet FGD system can affect the quality of the wastewater being discharged.

Bryan D. Hansen, P.E., Burns & McDonnell, Centennial, CO


Wednesday, November, 13, 2019; 1:00 – 5:00 PM

W01A: Water Treatment 101

This workshop is a great introductory course covering many of the basic concepts of industrial water treatment. It will address unit operations (clarification, filtration, lime/soda ash softening, iron and manganese removal, membrane filters, and roughing demineralizers) used in water preparation for industry with emphasis on power, chemical industry, and refineries. It includes treatment of cooling water systems as well as boiler water makeup. Wastewater generated by these unit operations and their treatment and disposal will be discussed. Basic water chemistry requirements for low, medium, and high-pressure boilers will also be discussed.

Dennis McBride, Burns & McDonnell, Kansas City, MO

 

W02A: The Wonderful World of Reverse Osmosis

Reverse osmosis (RO) has become a very popular and useful water treatment tool, for both water and wastewater applications. Understanding the fundamentals of RO, particularly as applications become more challenging in the environment of reduce, reuse, and recycle, is critical to optimal operations.  However, during the growth or RO applications, some of the basics have been lost in shuffle. And, many times professionals and operators familiar with other demineralization technologies are now faced with operating RO systems with little or no training. This Workshop covers the basics and best practices of RO technology, from sound design to proper operating techniques. Fouling and concentration polarization, data collection and normalization, cleaning and storage are just some of the topics included in this Workshop. This Workshop is intended for all who need to understand the essentials of RO to help obtain optimal performance of this technology.

Jane Kucera, Nalco Water, an Ecolab Company, Naperville, IL

 

W05: Wastewater Treatment 101

In this workshop, wastewater treatment process fundamentals will be discussed for in depth understanding of how the operating & processing units work in aerobic environment to treat the waste streams from refineries and chemical plants. Object of this course is to acquire basics of how to design, an open art robust wastewater system to produce acceptable quality effluent to be discharged into an approved estuary and or in pant make up water resource for cooling tower or steam generation. Instructions will include wastewater streams inventory and selective segregation to optimize pre-treatment processing units, such as, API, CPI, DAF, and IGF units. Conventional Activated Sludge bio reactors, Moving Bed Bio-Reactors, Membrane Bio-Reactors, secondary clarifiers, and sludge dewatering etc. will be discussed. Example of a typical refinery wastewater plant will be used to enhance understanding wastewater treatment process. Approximate Subject matter outline:

  • Identification of typical industrial wastewater streams
  • Selective segregation & characterization of wastewater streams
  • Explanation of WW terminology such as pH, Alkalinity, BOD, COD, TOC, TDS, Conductivity, TSS, & Turbidity
  • Physical / chemical treatment including Equalization, Oil/Water/Solids Separation, pH Adjustment, Temperature

Adjustment

  • Biological Treatment including microbiology, Nitrification/Denitrificataion, Activated Sludge Processes
  • Air Requirements
  • Solids production and management
  • Tertiary Treatment
  • Typical refinery wastewater treatment plant

Joe Guida, P.E. and Vina Arjomandnia, Fluor, Sugarland, TX; Josh Lawrence, P.Eng., Fluor, Calgary, AB, Canada

 

W06: Refinery Wastewater Treatment Concepts

Our Workshop Objective is to educate engineers and specialists on basic refinery wastewater treatment concepts. Outcomes will enable attendees to:

– Understand common refinery wastewater composition and treatment goals.

– Learn about conventional and advanced processes used to treat refinery wastewater.

– Understand the importance of data collection and interpretation for operations and compliance.

Skills from this workshop will enable attendees to improve their abilities to solve challenging wastewater treatment challenges in the refining sector.

Holly Johnson Churman, P.E., GHD, Houston, TX

 

W07: Industrial Boiler Water Treatment

This workshop is intended for those interested in industrial steam systems operating at pressures up to 1800 psig. While some basic theory is covered, the main focus of the course is to provide practical information that can be used to avoid common system problems. The course covers deaerators, boilers, steam turbines and condensate systems from both mechanical operation and chemical treatment aspects. The causes of deposition and corrosion as well as water quality and monitoring guidelines and chemical treatment options are discussed in an informal atmosphere.

Jim Robinson, SUEZ Water Technologies & Solutions, Trevose, PA

 

W08: Trouble Shooting an Ion Exchange Mixed Bed

In the water treatment plant, the ion exchange mixed bed units can be your best friend or worst enemy. Mixed beds can provide very high-quality water, for days, weeks or even months without regeneration. This means less hand on by operations, compared to normal Demin trains that could regenerate up to twice/day. Operators do not retain the day to day routine of regenerating a mixed bed and can become unfamiliar with how to trouble shoot problem. When a mixed bed unit does not work properly, it could take months or even years to get it back into proper operation. Part 1 of the training session will discuss some of the author’s +40 years of experience with trouble shooting and repairing various mixed bed system in North America. It will cover cases involving resin problems, mechanical failure inside the vessels and changes in feed water quality. Part 2, will cover resin parameters, choosing the best resins for the application, the importance of chemical dosages, and what to look for in the resin reports. Topics include

  • Introduction to mixed bed ion exchange.
  • Critical issues to monitor.
  • Critical steps of the regeneration and what can go wrong.
  • What IEX resin problems can you expect?
  • Where is the first place to look?
  • Resin parameters – why use strong versus weak resins
  • Choosing the best resins for the applications – working mixed bed, polishing mixed bed and disposable mixed bed.
  • Discussing the problems can you expect.
  • How to properly sample a resin bed.

Donald Downey, Purolite Corporation, Paris, ON, Canada

 

W09: Successful FGD Wastewater Treatment System Design and Operations

Flue Gas Desulfurization Wastewater Treatment systems are complex processes that comprise of multiple components such as physical/chemical operations, bioreactors, and filtration to address regulatory requirements. This workshop will dive into the design, build, and operation of these systems with experienced instructors. We will review what goes into designing the FGD wastewater treatment systems focusing on unit operations through key influent characteristics to monitor. We will dive into construction layouts that have demonstrated success and issues that have been encountered in the design/build of these systems. Lastly, we will cover hands on operating experience with these new systems to provide individuals the tools and lessons learned for successful operations and maintenance of an FGD WWT.

Derek Henderson, P.E. Duke Energy, Raleigh, NC; William Kennedy, P.E., Stantec, Charlotte, NC


Thursday, November 14, 2019; 8:00 AM – 12:00 Noon

W10: Water Treatment 201

This course reviews the topics covered in Water Treatment 101 and build on those to provide design and technical details on designing water treatment systems using supplier’s equipment information. Unit processes covered in this course are pretreatment softening using lime and soda ash, sodium cycle ion‐exchange for softening, demineralization of pretreated raw water using cation/ anion/ mixed‐bed ion‐exchange systems, reverse osmosis, and EDI. Boiler water chemistry guidelines and chemicals feeds for boiler chemistry control for high-pressure power plant boilers, combined cycle plants, and industrial boilers (up to 1500 psi) will be discussed. Advanced wastewater treatment concepts for power plants, industrial plants, and refineries will be included with recycle and reuse when feasible.

Americus Mitchell, Sundt Construction, Inc., Tempe, AZ; Sunil Sajja, Fluor, Sugarland, TX

 

W11: Electrodeionization (EDI)

Electrodeionization (EDI) is a hybrid of two well-known processes, ion-exchange deionization (IX) and electrodialysis (ED). It was developed to allow the production of deionized water without the use of the hazardous acid and caustic that is required to regenerate ion exchange resins. EDI is now over 30 years old and is used extensively in many industries, especially in the production of deionized water for pharmaceutical formulations, power generation and manufacture of microelectronics/semiconductor devices. It is usually employed as a polishing demineralization step with reverse osmosis (RO) upstream as the roughing demineralizer. This workshop will start by reviewing the principles of the EDI process, how it differs from IX, how EDI modules are constructed, and EDI feed water requirements. It will then focus on practical aspects of EDI system design, operation, maintenance and troubleshooting. This is an introductory course that requires no prior exposure to electrodeionization or electrodialysis. Some prior knowledge of basic water chemistry will be helpful.

Jon Wood, Evoqua Water Technologies LLC, Lowell, MA

 

W12: Industrial Water Reuse – A Roadmap for the Future

The primary objective of this workshop is knowledge transfer. It is aimed at those that are vested in developing “the industrial water reuse plant of the future” by unbiasedly comparing the more efficient and cost-effective methods to recover water. The workshop will address common issues facing industrial water reuse and compare treatment strategies. Topics will include:

– The three key aspects of water chemistry that drives design

– Options to get from point A to point B

– an unbiased comparison of the more popular water reuse flowsheets (i.e. membranes vs non-membrane approach)

– Navigating the changing water treatment technology landscape

– an unbiased comparison of the more popular treatment technologies (i.e. Clarifiers, MMF, MF, UF, GAC, IX, RO, ED, Chlorine, Ozone, AOP, UV)

– Emerging technologies and opportunities

– “Fit for purpose” water reuse strategies

– Optimizing cost and reliability

– Lessons learned and avoiding pitfalls

Facilitators will present on significant developments in the field of water reuse, relevant case studies that demonstrate successes and lessons learned that impact the design of the next generation of water reuse plants. Participants will leave the workshop with a broad understanding of the industrial water reuse landscape, why certain technologies are useful, how they work and how the capabilities of water reuse systems have grown in recent years.

Ed Greenwood, P.Eng, BCEE, Wood E&IS, Cambridge, ON, Canada

 

W13: Arsenic and Selenium in Wastewater Treatment

Changes in regulations in the coal-fired power industry and existing standards in the mining industry are but two examples of increased regulatory focus on arsenic and selenium. These ions have not been the focus of emphasis for widespread industrial treatment in the past. Numerous new technologies have been promoted for use in the treatment of arsenic and selenium. However, it is difficult for the environmental personnel responsible for making intelligent decisions in this area to assess the real potential of treatment technologies to cost-effectively achieve the desired goals. This course will provide the background necessary for those concerned with arsenic, selenium or both to make sound decisions about the technical direction of treatment options.

John Schubert, P.E., HDR Engineering, Sarasota, FL

 

W14: Contaminants A to Z

The number of trace contaminants found in water supplies continues to grow with new information regarding emerging contaminants such as PFAS and incidental contaminants such as pesticides, pharmaceuticals, and personal care products taking the stage alongside naturally occurring contaminants such as arsenic, gross alpha and problematic manmade inorganic contaminants such as mercury and lead. This years workshop includes (almost) every trace contaminant found in water with extensive back ground papers and information provided for each contaminant in electronic form. As such it is a powerful reference tool that every water treatment professional should have on their desktop. For each and every trace contaminant, the following information is provided

1.Facts about the contaminant including health risks

2.How it got into our water supply and what form(s) it is found in

3.The federal MCL or limits from health advisories or those set by various states

4.Treatment methods including BAT’s

5.Relevant papers and other information about the contaminant such as species diagrams, Pourbaix diagrams, health risks, treatment results, chemistry, etc. (provided on USB stick, CD, or link to cloud based storage)

This workshop is a MUST ATTEND for anyone who works in the field water treatment, especially those of us responsible for identifying solutions to water problems. There is no other source of information about Trace Contaminants that is more complete or better organized.

Peter Meyers, ResinTech, Inc., West Berlin, NJ

 

W15: Drinking Water and Waste Water Operator Training

At the end of this training the student will have a greater understanding of the following topics and associated principles of measurement:

  1. Water Treatment
  2. Clarification
  3. Filtration
  4. Impurities
  5. Contaminants
  6. Ion selective electrode measurement principle such as pH, fluoride, etc.
  7. Disinfection
  8. Chlorination
  9. Chloramination
  10. Measurement principles
  11. Turbidity history and measurement principles
  12. Corrosion control
  13. Instrumentation

The training method is lecture and hands on the instrumentation.

Randy Turner, SWAN Analytical USA, Wheeling, IL

 

W16: UF, RO and EDI Maintenance and Cleaning

This presentation covers the following topics for ultrafiltration (UF), reverse osmosis (RO), and continuous electro-deionization (CEDI)

  • A very brief description of the technologies
  • Best practices for extending membrane/module life
  • Common practices in data collection and interpretation
  • Best practices for off-line clean-in-place (CIP) processes, including why cleaning is important, what should trigger CIP, common foulants, preparation of cleaning solutions, standard cleaning procedures, tips and shortcuts, and when off-site membrane cleaning should be considered.
  • Membrane and module autopsies, when they are needed, and how to interpret the results.

Robert Cohen, Evoqua Water Technologies, Rochester, NY


Thursday, November 14, 2019; 1:00 – 5:00 PM

W03A: Ion Exchange Technology and Practical Operating Practices

This workshop provides a detailed review of the various ion exchange processes for softening and demineralizing water as well as preparation for boilers, cooling, and process applications. A section on how to evaluate systems, their resin, operation, and water quality of ion exchange units is an excellent troubleshooting and informative portion of this workshop. A review of the different types of ion exchange resins available along with the newest developments and how those can be applied to provide specific water quality is a must for water treatment system operations. This is a great opportunity to ask questions and solve problems.

Wayne Bernahl, W. Bernahl Enterprises, Ltd., Elmhurst, IL

 

W17: Chemical Metering Pump and Systems Fundamentals

All attendees will understand the different types of chemical meter pumps and how they should be installed and used. They will understand how to choose and size a chemical meter pump correctly and the common mistakes made. Also covered will be when to use a chemical feed system over just a chemical meter pump and why. They will understand and learn that not all applications are the same and require some prework before choosing a chemical metering pump and or chemical feed system.

Larry Pannell and Craig Dunn, Pulsafeeder SPO, Inc., Punta Gorda, FL

 

W18: HRSG and High-Pressure (>900 PSIG/60 BAR) Boiler Water Treatment and Operation

This workshop will explain high-pressure (>900 psig/60 bar) steam boiler and HRSG steam/water cycles, deaeration, chemistry monitoring, and chemical treatment for controlling deposition, under deposit corrosion, flow accelerated corrosion (FAC), carryover, and other deposit- and condensate, feedwater, evaporator and boiler water treatment- related problems. The course will also cover select corrective actions. Operators, chemists, utility plant supervisors, managers, and engineers can all benefit from the practical information provided in this course.

David Daniels, M&M Engineering Associates, Leander, TX

 

W19: Building a Best Practice Cooling Water Program

This interactive workshop focusses on the common issues associated with open recirculating cooling water systems in the form of corrosion, microbiological fouling and deposition related to scale formation and fouling. These issues are commonly referred to as the Cooling Water Triangle. Along with the issues that face cooling systems, the Best Practice cooling water treatment chemistries from past, present and future trends will be presented in detail. From this review, participants will be able to determine the Best Practice Cooling Water Program for their application. This workshop is recommended for operators, utility managers, and technical service engineers. Participants should bring a representative water analysis (makeup and recirculating tower water) and cooling system information (metallurgy, hottest skin temperature) for an in-session exercises and review.

Jo Ordonez, Solenis, Kyle, Texas

 

W20: Acid Mine Drainage: Origin, Causes, and Environmental Impacts and Recycle and Reuse Technologies

Acid mine drainage (AMD) is a very acidic and contaminated wastewater generated from mine operations. It is currently one of the largest environmental problems facing mining companies and municipalities regarding its management. The main objective will be: To share with delegates, unbiased expertise and advocacy with respect to the causes, management and amelioration of the impacts of Acid mine drainage (AMD) the specific objectives are described as follows:

To provide in-depth overview of AMD around the world

To describe the origin and the formation of AMD

To analyze the in details the environmental impacts of AMD

To provide information related to treatment methods, recycle and reuse strategies of AMD

Dr. Joseph K. Bwapwa, Mangosuthu University of Technology, Durban, South Africa

 

W21: Chlorine Dioxide: Chemistry, Generation, Analysis, Environmental Issues and Applications

I. About ClO2 – What is It & Why is it Used?

a. Health & Safety

b. Reaction Chemistry

c. Generation Chemistry & Equipment

d. Analytical

e. Environmental Considerations

II. Applications

a. Potable Water Disinfection

b. Biofilm

c. Cooling Tower Treatment

d. Closed Systems – Thermal Storage

e. Side Stream Filtration

f. Influent Disinfection

g. Alkaline Whitewater in Paper Mills

h. Steel Batch Mini Mills

i. Hydraulic Fracturing

III. Specific Topics

a. Corrosion

b. Demand Testing

c. Cl2 vs. ClO2

IV. Q & A

Practical Chlorine Dioxide: Volume I – Foundations Book Provided

Greg Simpson, Pureline Treatment Systems, Houston, TX

 

W22: RO design software – Concept to System Design

The use of RO and IX system design software is common in the water treatment industry. All manufacturers of RO membranes and IX resins offer design software that allows rapid and accurate system designs, often used as the basis of warranty performance, to model operating performance, or to compare process variables (and decisions on overall design). These design software packages have evolved with new capabilities, new inputs, outputs, and even design of integrated systems involving multi-step process sequences like UF to RO to IX. The Workshop will expose attendees to some available design software (IMS, LewaPlus, and WAVE), with an emphasis on modern RO design software. The workshop will present the basic concepts in RO process, explain manufacturer design guidelines, membrane aging models, overcoming design warnings, and a variety of system configurations (and power consumption options). The workshop will provide exposure to design steps for brackish water applications (low and high salinity), single and 2 pass SWRO systems, high recovery (>90%) RO systems, and integrated UF, RO, IX systems.The workshop will cover how certain high recovery RO systems compare with classic RO designs on critical metrics such as permeate salinity, power consumption, and water savings. Attendees will learn how different membranes (standard pressure, low pressure, and ultra-low pressure) impact permeate salinity, flux, and power consumption. The workshop will include a hands on design laboratory (attendees will design a high recovery RO systems using design software from several membrane manufacturers).

Alan Sharpe, Lanxess Sybron Chemicals, Inc., Birmingham, NJ